... In developing countries, commercialized handicraft production is classified as a traditional skill-based activities of a primary producer (artisan) like hand weaving, hand knitting, wood carving or ceramics painting that produce a pretty trinket hand-made items for products in the categories of gifts, house-ware items, home furnishings and fashion goods, that reach the local and foreign market through a number of intermediaries [8]. Previous studies of the factors relating to the management of a small enterprise, whether it is formal or informal production [9] [10], home-based or non-home based [11], or on a part-time or full-time status [12] contend that person's disposition (personality traits) and other external factors in person's surroundings (e.g supportive upbringing, financial situation, family and friends, networking, government support) might have an impact on their performance. So far, it is often assumed that higher performing enterprises are more likely to be operated from formal dedicated premises, with full-time employees, well-planned marketing activities and accounting tasks, whereas part-time and home-based businesses are likely to be smaller in scale, less formally managed and achieving lower revenues [11]. ...
... Consistent with Brekke (2015) and Isaksen (2015), in the immediate aftermaths of conflict, the triple helix of chaos, unpredictable destruction of factor endowments and physical immobility does make the penurious environment even more resource-poor, diminishing the capabilities to engage in non-necessity-based economic activities and confining entrepreneurial individuals to path-continuation. Factors that were traditionally considered entrepreneurship enablers, such as education ( Thompson et al., 2009Thompson et al., , 2010), offer minimal additional advantage. However, contrary to our expectations, as entrepreneurial individuals immersed themselves into the new order, they recognised new entrepreneurial opportunities through renewing and creating new paths by efficiently reconfiguring the meagre resources towards new purposes. ...
This site is EXACTLY what I was looking for. I am a fit and frisky 56 y.o. single dad working 2 jobs, with an unquenchable thirst for learning new things. I’ve been surreptitiously studying the New Thought writers (from Atkinson to Proctor right up to some of the really sharp, young people creating YouTube videos). I think I’m getting a grip on the self-motivation and metaphysics of the whole thing, but am too scattered to decide exactly what kind of business to start! many of your 27 ideas I have some familiarity with (one of my old army buddies got me in to Bombardier Transport in early 2011 for 3 months to help meet a deadline on some tech pubs…it was a lot of fun! I was told I’m a natural, but could not find any more jobs in that sector….Oy Gevalt). Anyway, thank you so much for this site! I can give you a progress report every few months or so (including showing you how any websites I may be creating are doing). Happy New Year!
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