But you don't have to be huge or famous to be a successful entrepreneur. The world is littered with entrepreneurs you never heard of who had an idea and turned it into a thriving, profitable business. There are moms who invented a gadget or started a lifestyle blog. Teenagers who star in their own YouTube shows. Retired folks who have turned a lifetime of experience into coaching or consulting business. Becoming an entrepreneur isn't hard, but it is work and requires many steps including:
... Entrepreneurship and location (ruralÀurban) Geographical location appears to be crucial in explaining entrepreneurship development. Empirical pieces of evidence show that higher competition, increase in population resulting higher population density, higher demand for goods and services, etc., result in higher entrepreneurship opportunities (Sorenson and Audia 2000; Reynolds et al. 2002; Shane 2003; Sternberg 2009). Studies found that the growth of entrepreneurship in the urban areas is much higher than that of rural areas (Shane 2003; Glaeser, Rosenthal, and Strange 2010). ...

In my experience, one of the greatest challenges people face is deciding why they are starting a business, what they hope to accomplish and what they really want to do. Starting a business, particularly from home, sounds glamorous and free but, in reality, it can put a strain on home life if not done right. People I talk to often need help decision-making which is an essential quality in running a business.
I overheard my wife talking to a homeschool mom that raises and sells a certain type of dog (a registered breed of some kind) ranging from $1,000 to $1,800. I also know a couple teens that started a bread business where they sell the product at the local famer’s market and local stores. The product(s) have been so successful, most of the family has been involved in it.
There are a lot of items that can be purchased very inexpensively at garage sales or thrift stores and sold for higher prices elsewhere. A few years ago I discovered that I could purchase good hardcover books at my local thrift shop for $1 or less. I realized that some of them could be sold on Amazon.com for $15-$20, which turns out to be a pretty decent profit.

This site is EXACTLY what I was looking for. I am a fit and frisky 56 y.o. single dad working 2 jobs, with an unquenchable thirst for learning new things. I’ve been surreptitiously studying the New Thought writers (from Atkinson to Proctor right up to some of the really sharp, young people creating YouTube videos). I think I’m getting a grip on the self-motivation and metaphysics of the whole thing, but am too scattered to decide exactly what kind of business to start! many of your 27 ideas I have some familiarity with (one of my old army buddies got me in to Bombardier Transport in early 2011 for 3 months to help meet a deadline on some tech pubs…it was a lot of fun! I was told I’m a natural, but could not find any more jobs in that sector….Oy Gevalt). Anyway, thank you so much for this site! I can give you a progress report every few months or so (including showing you how any websites I may be creating are doing). Happy New Year!
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