But you don't have to be huge or famous to be a successful entrepreneur. The world is littered with entrepreneurs you never heard of who had an idea and turned it into a thriving, profitable business. There are moms who invented a gadget or started a lifestyle blog. Teenagers who star in their own YouTube shows. Retired folks who have turned a lifetime of experience into coaching or consulting business. Becoming an entrepreneur isn't hard, but it is work and requires many steps including:
And don’t forget social media as a home-based business. Many churches, other non profit charities, and business owners NEED to advertise via social media. You can either be hired to do theirs or become a consultant who trains their staff. Many churches don’t know the Internet laws like an avid social media user does. They’ll need someone to teach them how to use social media and protect their organization while doing it. Ask me how I know. 😉 My husband and I have worked with some organizations who refused to listen and they ended up with some scandals. Take a gander at what happened to Pastor Alios Bell’s ministry reputation when someone who knows social media happened upon her indiscretion at Applebee’s. Google it. It went viral.
Do you love woodworking? Even without a huge workshop, you can create some of the more popular crafts and sell them.  And like most things, your success in business isn’t necessarily related to how skilled you are as a woodworker. So if you can figure out which products consumers want and just create those, you could have a good business plan.  Etsy.com and farmers’ markets are a great place to start selling.
Lifestyle Entrepreneur: Although the idea of lifestyle entrepreneur isn't new, it's gained in popularity with the rise of technology, the Internet, and a global economy. A lifestyle entrepreneur is one that builds a business that incorporates their interests and passions, and sustains their life goals. Many in this category are referred to as digital nomads because they often have online businesses that allow them to travel. However travel isn't necessary to be lifestyle entrepreneur. The key factor in a lifestyle entrepreneur is that they do what they love, and/or the business supports their chosen lifestyle.

Become an affiliate marketer. There are many companies and webmasters who use affiliate programs to boost their online sales, and most of these affiliate programs are free to join. When you sign up for an affiliate program, an affiliate link with a unique affiliate ID will be assigned to you. The affiliate link is used for marketing the products of your merchant. When a visitor buys an item through your affiliate link, you earn affiliate commission.[8]


I have a friend that is the city manager of a town of about 25,000 where his main task is processing requests for building permits. Actually a volunteer-type job, no salary. But he makes a bunch of contacts every day, and his address book is huge. So he is busy all year except the Holidays. To fill in this time he started a Christmas tree lighting service (houses, lawn ornaments, etc.). In this 3-month period he makes enough to keep him going the rest of the year.


Home-Based Business: A home based business could fit under the category of small business, but the primary factor in this case is that it's run from home, as opposed to an office or other location. But just because a business is run from home, doesn't mean it can't compete with larger businesses. In fact, many large corporations were started from a home, including Apple and Disney. 
Advertise! Whether you pay for advertising or you trade advertising with related websites and blogs, or you use free search sites, the important thing to remember is to put in the time and keep track of what works. Search out other websites and blogs with similar content and leave comments with your contact info. There are services that will do all the marketing for you for a fee, but to start out, you can do the marketing yourself. Fiverr.com will advertise your website starting at $5.

Affiliate marketing can be broken down into different levels of involvement: unattached, related and involved. Unattached affiliate marketing is a basic pay-per-click affiliate marketing campaign that requires little to no involvement with the product you are promoting. Related affiliate marketing requires you to have some authority and content on the product you are marketing, but you don't personally use the product. Involved affiliate marketing is perhaps the most effective, as you'll be marketing an affiliate product that you actually use and enjoy.
... To illustrate, three empirical studies are described, though this is not exhaustive. First, Thompson et al. (2009) use Global Entrepreneurship Monitor data, basing their measurement of HBB on nascent and start-up activities in the home. Elsewhere, Felstead et al. (2000) base their study on the 1998 Labour Force Survey that explores those who work mainly, sometimes or partially at home (both employed and self-employed), thus not separating employment and self-employment status. ...
... Amongst these few, British Telecommunications (2008) report that 58% of those operating an HBB in their sample claimed the desire for a better WLB as their primary motivation. Similar reports are found else- where: Stoner et al (1990) and Thompson et al (2009), for example, both focus exclusively on female-owned HBBs and find that the flexibility and autonomy associated with HBB ownership positively affects WLB. Control over time, and in some cases including reduced working hours, were other benefits identified by Thompson et al (2009). ...
With affiliate marketing, you offer the products for sale, for example, on your blog or e-commerce website. Each product has a unique link that tracks back to your account with your affiliate partner. A prospect who clicks on the link is taken to your partner’s shopping cart for checkout. Once they buy, that purchase is recorded and you receive a commission. Commission amounts vary depending on the affiliate partner, but is generally 5 percent to 25 percent, or 50 percent or more with digital information products.
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